Careers that Fit My Personality

It’s a fact: Workers who enjoy their careers are overall happier and perform better on the job. One way to determine how much you’ll enjoy your career is to look at jobs tailored for your personality. Are you looking for careers that fit my personality? Take a look at different personality types and find a career perfectly suited for you.

Certain workplaces and careers attract different personality types. Success on the job or within a company’s culture might require a certain personality type. This is why it is important to find careers that fit my personality. For example, an extrovert might exceed in sales while an introvert might prefer app development. It all boils down to how your intrinsic traits match with your career path.

How to Determine Your Personality Type

One widely-used tool to determine personality type is the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) personality test. The MBTI breaks personalities down into 16 types based on 8 characteristics:

  • Extraversion (E) or Introversion (I)
  • Sensing (S) or Intuitive (N)
  • Feeling (F) or Thinking (T)
  • Judging (J) or Perceiving (P)

This means your personality types might be ENFP or INTJ, based on your specific traits. You can have a test administered by a professional, but you can also get a general idea about your personality type from an online quiz.

The MBTI is a way of typing people based on how they think and act. Personality typing can help you point out general ways people are different and then puts them into meaningful groups based on their distinct traits.

The MBTI has been around for a long time. It was developed in the 1960s and is based on the work of famous psychologist Carl Jung.

Each of the 4 characteristics or dimensions presents a choice between two opposing styles of being. It's an either-or choice. The combination of these four preferences forms a personality type. This personality type can help determine predictable thought and behavior patterns. This can lead to similarities in the way people of the same personality type approach their lives and the career paths that might suit them.

Many companies use the MBTI to screen and learn more about job candidates. They might look at personality type to determine how you’ll work on a team, in which positions you’ll excel and how you’ll fit in with the company’s culture.

Personality Characteristics ExplainedPersonality Characteristics Explained

The four letters in an MBTI each stand for a different personality trait. This can define a style in your behavior or thinking.

 

  • Extraversion (E) or Introversion (I): Extroversion vs introversion determines how you get energy. Extroverts get energy from being around other people. They tend to be outgoing, outspoken and expressive. Introverts get energy from being alone or in a small group. They tend to be quieter and reserved.
  • Sensing (S) or Intuitive (N): Sensing vs intuition determines how a person processes information. Sensors get information from their five senses. They depend on what they can see, hear, touch, taste and smell. They also tend to be more practical. Intuitive types focus more on abstract thoughts. They are often described as creative and are often looking ahead to the future.
  • Feeling (F) or Thinking (T): Feeling vs thinking determines how you make decisions. Feelers make decisions with their hearts. They are concerned about how others will react to their decision. Feelers are also concerned with how their decisions align with their values. Thinkers tend to be more practical in decision making. They tend to make the most reasonable, logical choice.
  • Judging (J) or Perceiving (P): Judging vs perceiving determines how you look at structure in your life. Judgers tend to prefer order and structure, while perceivers are more flexible and spontaneous. Judgers dislike last minute decisions and prefer concrete plans, while perceivers tend to leave thing open to account for last minute changes and changes of heart.

 

Breaking Down the 16 Personality TypesBreaking Down the 16 Personality Types

Each personality type comes with its own traits. Here are summaries of the 16 types.

ISTJ: The Inspector

The traits that come from an introverted, sensing, thinking and judging personality can be intimidating. Many ISTJs come across as serious, proper and formal. They often have old school values. They honor hard work, uphold patience and display social responsibility. They also might seem quiet, upright and calm.

INFJ: The Counselor

Do you have creative ideas? Do you ooze imagination? If so, you might be an INFJ. You’ll likely find that INFJs have a different perspective on the world around them. Their personality traits give them depth and substance in their views of the world. INFJs never take anything at surface level. They have brilliant ideas and are good at accepting the big picture. Sometimes INFJs might be perceived as weird or different because of their distinctive outlook on life.

INTJ: The Mastermind

INTJs can be quiet and reserved. Like other introverts, they are comfortable being alone. INTJs are self-sufficient. They prefer to work alone rather than in a group because socializing can drain their energy. Many INTJs need alone time to recharge after social situations. INTJs are idea people. They are interested in thoughts and theories. You might find an INTJ questioning why things happen the way they do. INTJs are planners and don’t like uncertainty.

ISTP: The Crafter

ISTPs are an interesting group. That can be logical and rational, but also spontaneous and enthusiastic. The might keep their personality traits under wraps, making them come across as mysterious. This means that even people who know them well have trouble predicting their reactions or their next moves. Though they are spontaneous and unpredictable, they can hide these traits from the world around them.

INFP: The Idealist

Like other introverts, INFPs come across as being reserved and quiet. They don’t like to toot their own horns, so they don’t like to talk about themselves or their accomplishments. They value alone time and solitude, and might enjoy spending time in quiet places where they can observe and analyze the world around them. They love dissecting and evaluating symbols and signs and can relate these to the deeper meaning of life. They might be lost in daydreams at times. They can often be found with their heads in the clouds. Fantasies, thoughts and ideas are important to INFPs

INTP: The Thinker

INTP might be the most logical of all the personality types. They are known for their rationale and theories, INTPs have a knack for picking up on patterns and divarications. INTPs also have a well-developed ability to read people. This means it’s a bad idea to lie to an INTP. You might find that INTPs aren’t overinvolved with everyday activities. However, when they find a place to express their full potential, greatness will ensue. INTPs will work without limits toward developing a fair and insightful solution to any challenge they encounter.

ISFP: The Composer

The warmest and outgoing, the ISFP might not seem like an introvert at first. They are approachable and friendly, even if they have trouble relating to others at times. ISFPs are fun to be with and they make wonderful friends. They can be spontaneous and make a great adventure partner, whether planned or unplanned. ISFPs often live in the present moment and live their lives to the fullest. They love exploring new places and enjoying new experiences. They often find wisdom in new experiences. ISFPs value meeting new people.

ISFJ: The Nurturer

Unselfish and kind-hearted, ISFJs are always ready to give back. They often return generosity with even more generosity. They support people and ideas they believe in with passion and spirit. ISFJs can be very attuned to other people’s moods and feelings. Harmony and cooperation are very important to ISFJs. In many cases, ISFJs are appreciated for being considerate and aware. They are also valued for their ability to bring out the best in others.

ENFJENFJ: The Giver

Like other extroverts, ENFJs are people focused. They are charming, charismatic, outspoken and idealistic. ENFJs value principals and ethics. They can be very outspoken but are able to connect with most people regardless of their personality or background. ENFJs often rely on their intuition and feelings in many situations. You might find that ENFJs tend to live in their fantasies rather than the real world. Instead of focusing on the present moment, ENFJs are often lost in daydreams. Abstract concepts and possibilities appeal to ENFJs and often occupy their thoughts.

ESFJ: The Provider

When you think of an extrovert, an ESFJ likely comes to mind. ESFJs are social butterflies. They like making people happy and can be quite popular. Many high school sports athletes and cheerleaders are ESFJs. Later in life, they still enjoy the spotlight but might focus more on their families, friends and their surrounding community. ESFJ is one of the more common personality types and they are liked by many people.

ESFP: The Performer

ESFPs can be quite entertaining. Generally perceived as performers, they have an extroverted, sensing, feeling personality. ESFPs often have strong people skills. They are fun and lively and live to be the center of attention. This doesn’t mean they are selfish, though. ESFPs are also concerned about the well being of others and are friendly and sympathetic. They love exploring and experiencing new things and telling others about their experience.

ESTP The DoerESTP: The Doer

Those with an ESTP personality don’t stay still for long. They’re always on the move. ESTPs are driven by an innate need for social interaction. They also thrive on logical processes. You might find that ESTPs don’t like being tied down in one place for long -- they need freedom. ESTPs tend to not look before they leap, and might focus on fixing mistakes as they make them rather than preparing plans in advance. Their spontaneous approach to life and work mean that some situations, like school, might be challenging at times.

ENFP: The Campaigner

ENFPs aren’t cookie cutter people. They often create their own styles, methods, habits and actions. They are independent thinkers and often have their own ideas. ENFPs hate being forced to live in a box. They enjoy the company of others and they have an intuitive drive. ENFPs operated based on their feelings, which means they can be quite thoughtful and perceptive. Additionally, ENFPs have many diverse talents. They have the drive to become good at anything that interests them. On the same token, when disinterested, ENFPs tend to give up quickly. They do best in situations that allow them to be creative and generate new ideas.

ENTP: The Seer

Unlike other extroverts, ENTPs might not thrive in social situations. They don’t enjoy small talk and might have trouble relating to people who are different. ENTPs are very intelligent people and value knowledge. This side has a caveat, as they also feel the need to be constantly stimulated mentally. They like discussing facts and theories in detail. ENTPs are rational and logical, and they go into most discussions and arguments with a clear, objective mind. They aren’t afraid to question things around them and will dismiss ideas that aren’t logical. They value freedom and don’t like to be controlled.

ENTJ: The Leader

ENTJs are natural born leaders who see obstacles as opportunities. Their primary focus is external and making sure everything around them is dealt with logically and rationally. Their secondary mode of operation is internal. Internally, they focus on reasoning and intuition. They like pushing themselves and making decisions. This gives them a natural knack for leadership. ENTJs do not like to sit still and often have a take-charge mentality. Even though they are extroverts and need contact with others, they can have trouble relating to other people.

ESTJ: The Good Citizen

You’ll likely find that ESTJs are traditional, principled and organized. They are model citizens and take pride in doing what is right. ESTJs are role models and natural born leaders. They have a knack for taking on obstacles and make overcoming them look simple and easy. Because of their traditional side, ESTJs might have trouble accepting unconventional and new ideas. ESTJs don’t tolerate change well and would rather stay in familiar situations. They love organizing events that bring communities and family together and uphold traditional values.

With so many personality types and so many job paths, it might seem daunting to find a career that fits my personality. Read on to learn more about which careers might be a good fit for you.

Careers that Fit My PersonalityCareers That Fit My Personality

If you know your personality type, you can determine what jobs might be a good match for you -- even without taking a career test. Use the guide below to help determine careers that fit my personality.

ISTJ

This personality type are natural leaders with a knack for memorization and details. They can be great leaders, but tend to prefer to work behind the scenes. Great career choices for ISTJs include:

  • Accountants
  • Administrators and managers,
  • Auditors
  • Business executives
  • Computer programmers
  • Computer specialists
  • Electricians
  • Judges
  • Lawyers
  • Math teachers and mathematicians
  • Mechanical engineers
  • Medical doctors and dentists
  • Police officers and detectives
  • Systems analysts

INFJ

INFJs can be true visionaries. They find fulfillment when they are working forward their vision. Great career choices for INFJs include:

  • Child care workers
  • Clergy and missionaries
  • Counselors
  • Education consultant
  • Librarians
  • Marketers
  • Medical doctors and dentists
  • Musicians and artists
  • Psychologists and psychiatrists
  • Social workers
  • Teachers
  • Writers

INTJ

You might find that INTJs have a keen ability to grasp difficult and complex ideas. They excel at building strategies to overcome these complex challenges. If you’re an INTJ, careers that fit my personality include:

  • Scientists
  • Engineers
  • Professors and teachers
  • Medical doctors and dentists
  • Corporate strategists
  • Organization founders
  • Business administrators and managers
  • Military
  • Lawyers and judges
  • Computer programmers
  • System analysts
  • Computer specialists
  • Researchers

ISTP

If you stay calm under pressure, you might be an ISTP. ISTPs excel in positions that are quick moving and require immediate action. Careers that suit an ISTP personality include:

  • Athletes
  • Computer programmers
  • Computer specialists
  • Construction workers
  • Corrections and probation officers
  • Engineers
  • Firefighters and paramedics
  • Forensic pathologists
  • Military
  • Pilots
  • Police and detectives
  • System analysts

INFP

Personal values and creativity make INFPs unique. INFPs like offering support from behind the scenes and tend to avoid the spotlight. Careers that may fit an INFP personality include:

  • Artists
  • Child care workers
  • Clergy and missionaries
  • Counselors
  • English and fine arts teachers
  • Journalists
  • Political activists
  • Psychologists and psychiatrists
  • Scientists
  • Social workers
  • Writers and editors

INTP

INTPs are very analytical and very good at finding patterns. They can often find ways to correlate seemingly unrelated things. They work best when they can use their well-honed critical thinking skills. Careers that may fit an INTP personality include:

  • Computer programmers
  • Engineers
  • Lawyers
  • Mathematicians
  • Photographers
  • Professors and researchers
  • Scientists
  • Social scientists
  • Strategic planners
  • Surveyors
  • Systems analysts
  • Technical writers

ISFP The ComposerISFP

With skills in the arts and helping others, ISFPs are introverts who like working with people. They might excel in careers including:

  • Artists
  • Musicians
  • Composers
  • Designers
  • Child care workers
  • Social workers
  • Counselors
  • Teachers
  • Veterinarians
  • Forest Rangers
  • Bookkeepers
  • Carpenters
  • Personal service workers
  • Clerical supervisors
  • Secretaries
  • Dental and medical staffers
  • Chefs

ISFJ

ISFJs excel in situations with structure. They are good at helping people reach their goals and can be traditional and down to earth. If you’re an ISFJ, careers that fit your personality might include:

  • Interior Decorators
  • Designers
  • Nurses
  • Administrators
  • Managers
  • Secretaries
  • Childcare/early childhood development
  • Social work
  • Counselors
  • Paralegals
  • Clergy
  • Office managers
  • Gardeners
  • Clerical supervisors
  • Curators
  • Family practice physicians
  • Health service workers
  • Librarians
  • Medical technologists

ENFJ

People focused and value driven, ENFJs can help others be their best selves. They also can provide excellent leadership. Careers that fit an ENFJ personality include:

  • Actors
  • Clergy
  • Consultants
  • Counselors
  • Designers
  • Diplomats
  • Events coordinators
  • Human resource
  • Managers
  • Musicians
  • Politicians
  • Psychiatrists
  • Sales representative
  • Social workers
  • Teachers
  • Writers

ESFJ

ESFJs have warm outgoing personalities. They perform well in jobs where they can let their personalities shine and build relationships with others. Careers that suit and ENFJ personality include:

  • Accounting
  • Administrators
  • Bookkeeping
  • Childcare
  • Clergy
  • Counselors
  • Dental assistants
  • Family practice physician
  • Home economics
  • Nursing
  • Office managers
  • Organization leaders
  • Radiological technologists
  • Receptionists
  • Religious educators
  • Secretaries
  • Social workers
  • Speech pathologists
  • Teaching

ESFP

Known for being optimistic and fun loving, ESFPs are an enthusiastic bunch. They excel at motivating others. If you’re an ESFP, careers that fit your personality might include:

  • Actors
  • Painters
  • Comedians
  • Sales representatives
  • Teachers
  • Counselors
  • Social workers
  • Childcare
  • Fashion designers
  • Interior Decorators
  • Consultants
  • Photographers
  • Musicians
  • Human resources managers
  • Clerical supervisors
  • Coaches
  • Factory supervisors
  • Food service workers
  • Receptionists
  • Recreation workers
  • Respiratory therapists

ESTP

ESTPs never slow down. They’re always on the go, which means they can react to and solve problems practically as the occur. They also have a knack for persuading other people. Careers that suit and ESTP personality might include:

  • Agents
  • Auditors
  • Comedians
  • Computer technical support
  • Computer technicians
  • Craft workers
  • Entrepreneurs
  • Farmers
  • Firefighters
  • Laborers
  • Logistics and transportation
  • Marketers
  • Medical technicians
  • Military
  • Paramedics
  • Police and detectives
  • Sales representatives
  • Service workers

ENFP

ENFPs march to the beat of their own drums. They like being in positions that let them be creative and have fun. They excel at careers that let them express themselves and foster their spontaneity. Careers that may fit an ENFP personality include:

  • Actors
  • Artists
  • Consultants
  • Counselors
  • Entrepreneurs
  • Journalists
  • Marketers
  • Musicians
  • Painters
  • Politicians
  • Psychiatrists
  • Psychologists
  • Public relations
  • Sales representatives
  • Scientists
  • Social workers
  • Teachers
  • Television reporters
  • Writers

ENTP

Freedom oriented ENTPS excel in careers that allow them to work independently. They also love when they can express their creativity and insight. Careers that best suit an ENTP personality type include:

  • Actors
  • Artists
  • Comedians
  • Computer analysts
  • Computer programmers
  • Consultants
  • Designers
  • Engineers
  • Entrepreneurs
  • Inventors
  • Journalists
  • Lawyers
  • Marketers
  • Musicians
  • Photographers
  • Politicians
  • Psychiatrists
  • Psychologists
  • Public relations
  • Sales representatives
  • Scientists
  • Writers

ENTJ

Born leaders like ENTJs can steer an entire organization toward their vision. They are very organized and have clear site of what needs to be done. They excel in careers where they can use their ingrained leadership skills. Career options that suit an ENTJ personality include:

  • Business administrators
  • Business executives
  • CEOs
  • Computer consultants
  • Credit investigators
  • Entrepreneurs
  • Judges
  • Labor relations worker
  • Lawyers
  • Managers
  • Marketing manager
  • Mortgage banker
  • Organization founders
  • Politicians
  • Scientists
  • Systems analysts
  • University professors

ESTJ

ESTJs are also natural leaders. They excel at enforcing the rules. You’ll likely find that ESTJs are traditional, principled and organized. They are model citizens and take pride in doing what is right.

  • Business administrators
  • Financial officers
  • Government workers
  • Insurance agents
  • Judge
  • Managers
  • Military
  • Nursing administrators
  • Police/detective work
  • Sales representatives
  • Teachers
  • Underwriter

Your MBTI type can determine more than just careers at which you might excel. It can determine how you’ll form workplace relationships, how you’ll work on a team and how you might fit into the company culture. It can be very useful in finding careers that fit my personality.

Leadership Styles of Each Personality TypeLeadership Styles of Each Personality Type

Some personality types, like the ESTJ, are natural born leaders. That doesn’t mean that other personalities can’t excel in leadership roles. Knowing your personality type’s leadership style can further help your breakdown careers that fit my personality and how you might advance in your career.

Here are how the 16 personality types might perform as leaders:

  • ISTJ: ISTJs are detail-oriented leaders. They are careful and quiet and they focus on clear direction and quick action. They can take charge of projects and make sure tasks are completed in a detailed and fact-based way.
  • INFJ: INFJs are insightful leaders. They are passionate and can lead an organization toward a vision. Leadership positions that serve a humanitarian cause are often a good fit for INFJs. They tend to be workaholics and can push themselves beyond their limits.
  • INTJ: INTJs are strategic leaders. They lead with authority, vision and rationale. They have a focused, calm demeanor and are good at planning ahead. They look at the big picture when making decisions and can determine a logical course of action.
  • ISTP: ISTPs are tactical leaders. They are casual, open-minded and realistic. They can plan for success. As leaders, they allow for freedom. This means they often let their subordinates work toward their own path to success.
  • INFP: INFPs are sincere leaders. They are empathetic, caring and passionate. They fight for causes they believe in and can thrive in humanitarian positions. They are open-minded leaders and take considerations from many different viewpoints. They might struggle with delivering criticism.
  • INTP: INTPs can be unconventional leaders. They take in others’ opinions and strive to be diplomatic. They take pride in making sure everyone feels heard. They tend to avoid micromanagement. As leaders, they allow their teammates' freedom to solve problems.
  • ISFP: ISFPs are sensitive leaders. They are adaptable and can be very good listeners. They often lead quietly and from behind, which allows them to give teammates freedom to work toward the vision on their own. When making decisions, they consider values.
  • ISFJ: ISFJs are thoughtful leaders. They are devoted and committed. ISFJs care for their teams, meet deadlines and keep groups organized. With clear expectations, ISFJs are good at providing detail-oriented instructions.
  • ENFJ: ENFJs are passionate leaders. They are motivational and charismatic. They believe in making the world a better place and often lead by example. They look ahead toward the future and are goal oriented. ENFJs hate conflict and can avoid confrontation. This can lead them to withholding criticism.
  • ESFJ: ESFJs are generous leaders. They are hardworking and try to deeply connect and empathize with teammates and subordinates. They are dedicated and love working toward shared goals. Kindness and clarity are important to ESFJs as leaders and they often lead with diplomacy.
  • ESFP: ESFPs are charismatic leaders. They are flexible and often make work and projects fun. They are adaptable and excited about new opportunities. ESFPs thrive on connecting with people around them. When making decisions, they consider their values and the values of those around them.
  • ESTP: ESTPs are fearless leaders. They find opportunities and take advantage of them with haste. ESTPs love adventure and can be inspiring leaders. Logic is an essential part of the ESTP decision-making process. Pros and cons are considered and the ESTP leader will find the quickest route to success.
  • ENFP: ENFPs are inspirational leaders. They are encouraging and inspiring. ENFPs like making a difference in the world and they can be resourceful. Additionally, ENFP leaders thrive on giving all teammates a chance to speak their mind. When making decisions, they think about the impact on those around them.
  • ENTP: ENTPs are innovative leaders. They can be competitive, but this gives them a strategic advantage. With a proclivity toward entrepreneurship, they strive toward constant personal growth and don’t back away from obstacles. ENTPs aren’t afraid to try new things and they usually choose the most logical course of action.
  • ENTJ: ENTJs are assertive leaders. They are confident and straight forward. You can count on an ENTJ leader to inspire confidence and lead with honesty. Others often find their work ethic and motivation inspiring. They are decisive and use reasoning when making decisions.
  • ESTJ: ESTJs are decisive leaders. With a love of organizing people, ESTJs like making tough decisions. They are down-to-earth and sensible. ESTJs might see things as black and white and stick to the choices they make. Some ESTJ leaders can be micromanagers and can get so focused on making decisions that they overlook their teammates' feelings.

 

Regardless of your personality type or leadership/mentor style, you’ll be able to find a career path that suits you. Take a personality test, browse careers that fit my personality and start working toward your dream job.

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